Block engine problem Brisbane - CORROSION / HOLE IN

The most common cause of a hole in the side of a block is a broken conrod. See BROKEN/conrod.  The block damage is sometimes confined to the crankcase area and is quite repairable. Damage usually extends to an oil gallery or water jacket and this usually renders the repair uneconomical and block replacement is a better option. A pin hole in the bore is another common problem. This is usually repaired by fitting a sleeve. See BLOCK/cracked for more information. The problem with a corrosion pin hole is that the state of the apparently unaffected bores is an unknown quantity. Corrosion is a methodical, chemical etching away of the parent material. The bore that has the pin hole should be inspected closely to determine how bad the corrosion is. If it is extreme in that bore there is a good chance that the others are very close to doing the same. Therefore a decision to replace the block or to sleeve all cylinders has to be considered. Diesel with wet liners suffer from erosion of the liners. Cavitation Erosion is a totally different process. This is caused by the entrapment of tiny air bubbles in the cooling system and their subsequent action on the liner. The tiny vapour bubbles are formed by the mechanical vibrations caused by combustion and the action of the piston slapping against the bore. The action of the vapour bubbles imploding against the inside of the liner cause cavitation erosion. The outside of the liner usually has a position covered in many small perforated holes or pit marks. Factors that increase the action of cavitation erosion are cooling system pressure loss, the induction of air and overheating. Petrol engines don't suffer the effects of cavitation erosion the same as diesel's, because combustion pressures and harsh piston contact are much less in petrol engines compared to diesel engines. Petrol engines suffer more from hot spot boiling erosion damage. Disclaimer Agreement : Every care has been taken in writing this information and procedures, but no responsibility can be excepted for errors, omissions or misuse of this information and procedures. The information available on this site is for your instruction only and cannot be copied for sale, © copyright 2001 UMR Engines
Performance Engines
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Block engine problem Brisbane -

CORROSION / HOLE IN

The most common cause of a hole in the side of a block  is a broken conrod. See BROKEN/conrod.  The block damage is sometimes confined to the crankcase area and is quite repairable. Damage usually extends to an oil gallery or water jacket and this usually renders the repair uneconomical and block replacement is a better option. A pin hole in the bore is another common problem. This is usually repaired by fitting a sleeve. See BLOCK/cracked for more information. The problem with a corrosion pin hole is that the state of the apparently unaffected bores is an unknown quantity. Corrosion is a methodical, chemical etching away of the parent material. The bore that has the pin hole should be inspected closely to determine how bad the corrosion is. If it is extreme in that bore there is a good chance that the others are very close to doing the same. Therefore a decision to replace the block or to sleeve all cylinders has to be considered. Diesel with wet liners suffer from erosion of the liners. Cavitation Erosion is a totally different process. This is caused by the entrapment of tiny air bubbles in the cooling system and their subsequent action on the liner. The tiny vapour bubbles are formed by the mechanical vibrations caused by combustion and the action of the piston slapping against the bore. The action of the vapour bubbles imploding against the inside of the liner cause cavitation erosion. The outside of the liner usually has a position covered in many small perforated holes or pit marks. Factors that increase the action of cavitation erosion are cooling system pressure loss, the induction of air and overheating. Petrol engines don't suffer the effects of cavitation erosion the same as diesel's, because combustion pressures and harsh piston contact are much less in petrol engines compared to diesel engines. Petrol engines suffer more from hot spot boiling erosion damage. Disclaimer Agreement : Every care has been taken in writing this information and procedures, but no responsibility can be excepted for errors, omissions or misuse of this information and procedures. The information available on this site is for your instruction only and cannot be copied for sale, © copyright 2001 UMR Engines
Performance Engines
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